All Posts tagged Physical exercise

Chronic Back Pain? Don’t take opioids, try Physical Therapy

Chronic Back Pain? Don’t take opioids, try Physical Therapy

Millions of people take opioids for chronic back pain, but many of them get limited relief while experiencing side effects and worrying about the stigma associated with taking them.
More than 100 million people in the United States suffer from chronic pain, and those with chronic low back pain are more likely than patients with other types of pain to be prescribed opioids. Unfortunately, these medications are addictive and can cause side effects, ranging from drowsiness to breathing problems.

“Patients are increasingly aware that opioids are problematic, but don’t know there are alternative treatment options,” said Asokumar Buvanendran, M.D., lead author of the study, director of orthopedic anesthesia and vice chair for research at Rush University, Chicago, and vice chair of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Committee on Pain Medicine. “While some patients may benefit from opioids for severe pain for a few days after an injury, physicians need to wean their patients off them and use multi-modal therapies instead.”

In the study, 2,030 people with low back pain completed a survey about treatment. Nearly half (941) were currently taking opioids. When asked how successful the opioids were at relieving their pain, only 13 percent said “very successful.” The most common answer — given by 44 percent — was “somewhat successful” and 31 percent said “moderately successful.” Twelve percent said “not successful.”

Seventy-five percent said they experienced side effects including constipation (65 percent), sleepiness (37 percent), cognitive issues (32 percent) and dependence (29 percent).

Respondents also had concerns about the stigma associated with taking opioids. Forty-one percent said they felt judged by using opioids. While 68 percent of the patients had also been treated with antidepressants, only 19 percent felt a stigma from using those.

A major pharmaceutical company recently agreed to disclose in its promotional material that narcotic painkillers carry serious risk of addiction and not to promote opioids for unapproved, “off-label” uses such as long-term back pain. Researchers also note a lack of solid studies on the effectiveness of opioids in treating back pain beyond 12 weeks.

Patients with chronic low back pain, persistent pain lasting more than three months, should see a pain medicine specialist who uses an approach that combines a variety of treatments that may be more beneficial, said Dr. Buvanendran. These treatments include physical therapy, bracing, interventional procedures such as nerve blocks, nerve ablation techniques or implantable devices, other medications such as anti-inflammatories and alternative therapies such as biofeedback and massage, he said.

Story Source:

American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). “Many back pain patients get limited relief from opioids and worry about taking them, survey shows.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 October 2016.

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Tennis elbow…perhaps not from Tennis!

Tennis elbow…perhaps not from Tennis!

Lateral epicondylalgia or tennis elbow is the most common cause of musculoskeletal
pain located near the elbow. It is commonly known as tennis elbow as it can be a significant problem amongst tennis players. However, you do not need to play tennis to have experienced this injury. It is reported that approximately 40% of people will experience this type of pain at some point in their life and it usually presents in males or females aged between 35 and 54. Lateral epicondylalgia is an injury to the forearm muscles that act to extend the wrist and fingers. The point of injury occurs at the site where the muscle attaches to the bone near the elbow.

What causes tennis elbow?
Lateral epicondylalgia is usually caused by an overload of the forearm extensor muscles where the load is more than what normal muscle tissue can handle. Associated neck or shoulder pain may also contribute to the presentation. Common causes or activities can include:

Poor technique during sports or other activities i.e. racquet sports
Manual workers with jobs involving repetitive gripping and hand tasks
Office workers with jobs involving repetitive use of the keyboard and mouse
Diagnosis

Symptoms of lateral epicondylalgia include tenderness over the side of the elbow and pain with activities involving gripping or wrist extension. There may also be areas of tightness through the forearms and pain when the involved muscles are stretched. Your physiotherapist will be able to diagnose this condition based on physical examination and gathering a complete history of your injury. Your physiotherapist may also send you for medical imaging scans to assist in ruling out other causes of elbow pain including muscle tears, ligament injury and elbow instability or pain that is originating from the neck.

Physiotherapy
The goals of treatment are to reduce pain, promote healing and decrease the amount of stress applied to the elbow. Also, to restore full strength and movement of the elbow and wrist. Early treatment may include:
Rest from aggravating activities
Exercise programs involving gradual strengthening and stretching
Massage and other soft tissue techniques
Taping to reduce load on the muscle and tendon
Acupuncture or dry needling
Once pain levels have decreased, physiotherapy will involve prescription of more difficult or specific strengthening exercises and correction of any predisposing biomechanical or technique problems. These are essential to prevent future aggravation and shorten recovery time.
Braces

Braces are available which are designed to assist in alleviating pain by reducing the amount of stress on the tendon. However, not all people will benefit from using a brace. Your physiotherapist will be able to guide you through all stages of rehabilitation.

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Osteoarthritis treatment

Osteoarthritis treatment

There is a common belief that there is not much you can do for osteoarthritis because the joint damage has already occurred and can’t be reversed. However it is often the inflammation of the tissue surrounding the joint and instability from the weakened tissues that lead to pain from an arthritic joint.

Our physiotherapists may be able to help you decrease the inflammation and pain around the joint and get you moving again. Here is some information about osteoarthritis and how we can help.

What is osteoarthritis?

Arthritis is a name for a group of conditions that cause damage to the joints in our body, usually causing pain and stiffness

Osteoarthritis is one of these conditions and it affects the whole joint, including bone, cartilage, ligaments and muscles

It is most prevalent in the joints of the hips, knees, neck, lower back, fingers and big toe, but can occur in any joint

It is degeneration of the joint structures, namely the cartilage (protective cushioning on the bony surfaces) and its underlying bone surfaces
Bony growths or spurs commonly known as osteophytes are common in osteoarthritis
Ligaments and muscles around the joint also deteriorate in osteoarthritis
It normally affects a joint on one side of the body i.e. it doesn’t normally occur bilaterally like other arthritic conditions

There are other arthritic conditions you may have heard of such as rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.

Signs and symptoms

Joint pain
Joint stiffness
Swelling of the joints
Symptoms usually develop and worsen gradually over months or years
Affecting ability to carry out normal daily activities
Clicking/grinding in the joint
Loss of flexibility in a joint
What causes osteoarthritis?
Previous joint trauma/injury
Being overweight greatly increases your risk
High joint stress/repetitive use/heavy loads
There is an increase risk as you age and there is more ‘wear and tear’ on the joints

Diagnosis

Arthritis can be diagnosed by taking a thorough history and physical examination
X-ray can help confirm a diagnosis – you may need to see your doctor to get a referral

Treatment

Our physiotherapists can help you with:
Strength and exercise programme
Joint mobilisation/soft tissue techniques
Hydrotherapy
Aids or braces
Education
Weight loss programme
Medication and joint supplements – your doctor can guide you on the best options
Surgical options such as joint replacement
Pre-operative rehabilitation has been shown to improve outcomes post-operatively, so if you are requiring surgery come and find out how you can help speed up your recovery with pre-hab

Some hints for the colder months

Cold weather can exacerbate joint pain and joint stiffness. Remembering a few common sense tips can help people with osteoarthritis survive cold weather:
Dress warmly and layer up
Exercise indoors to stay motivated and warmer
Use a heated pool for exercise – talk to your physiotherapist for local options and classes
Ensure your vitamin D levels are adequate
You don’t have to wait for the warmer months to reduce pain associated with osteoarthritis! Book an appointment with a physiotherapist online 24/7,

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NEJM says Physio as effective as surgery!

NEJM says Physio as effective as surgery!

A New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) study showing that physical therapy is just as effective as surgery in patients with meniscal tears and arthritis of the knee should encourage many health care providers to reconsider their practices in the management of this common injury, according to the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA).

The study, published March 19, showed no significant differences in functional improvement after 6 months between patients who underwent surgery with postoperative physical therapy and those who received standardized physical therapy alone.
“This study demonstrates what physical therapists have long known,” explained APTA President Paul A. Rockar Jr, PT, DPT, MS. “Surgery may not always be the best first course of action. A physical therapist, in many cases, can help patients avoid the often unnecessary risks and expenses of surgery. This study should help change practice in the management of symptomatic meniscal tears in patients with knee osteoarthritis.”

According to lead physical therapist for the trial and American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) member Clare Safran-Norton, PT, PhD, OCS, “our findings suggest that a course of physical therapy in this patient population may be a good first choice since there were no group differences at 6 months and 12 months in this trial. These findings should help surgeons, physicians, physical therapists, and patients in decision-making regarding their treatment options.”

Researchers at 7 major universities and orthopedic surgery centers around the country studied 351 patients aged 45 years or older who had a meniscal tear and mild-to-moderate osteoarthritis of the knee. Patients were randomly assigned to groups who received either surgery and postoperative physical therapy or standardized physical therapy. Within 6-12 months, patients who had physical therapy alone showed similar improvement in functional status and pain as those who had undergone arthroscopic partial meniscectomy surgery.

Patients who were given standardized physical therapy — individualized treatment and a progressive home exercise program — had the option of “crossing over” to surgery if substantial improvements were not achieved. Thirty percent of patients crossed over to surgery during the first 6 months. At 12 months these patients reported similar outcomes as those who initially had surgery. Seventy percent of patients remained with standardized physical therapy.

According to an accompanying editorial in NEJM,”millions of people are being exposed to potential risks associated with a treatment [surgery] that may or may not offer specific benefit, and the costs are substantial.” Physical therapist and APTA member Mary Ann Wilmarth, PT, DPT, MS, OCS, MTC, Cert MDT, chief of physical therapy at Harvard University, said, “Physical therapists are experts in improving mobility and restoring motion. The individualized treatment approach is very important in the early phases of rehabilitation in order to achieve desired functional outcomes and avoid setbacks or complications.”
Journal Reference:
Jeffrey N. Katz, Robert H. Brophy, Christine E. Chaisson, Leigh de Chaves, Brian J. Cole, Diane L. Dahm, Laurel A. Donnell-Fink, Ali Guermazi, Amanda K. Haas, Morgan H. Jones, Bruce A. Levy, Lisa A. Mandl, Scott D. Martin, Robert G. Marx, Anthony Miniaci, Matthew J. Matava, Joseph Palmisano, Emily K. Reinke, Brian E. Richardson, Benjamin N. Rome, Clare E. Safran-Norton, Debra J. Skoniecki, Daniel H. Solomon, Matthew V. Smith, Kurt P. Spindler, Michael J. Stuart, John Wright, Rick W. Wright, Elena Losina. Surgery versus Physical Therapy for a Meniscal Tear and Osteoarthritis. New England Journal of Medicine, 2013; 130318220107009 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1301408

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