All posts in Pain sciences

Sciatica Treatment

Sciatica Treatment

What is Sciatica?

Sciatica is the name given to pain, numbness or weakness in the areas that are supplied by the sciatic nerve. These areas include hip, buttock, thigh, calf and foot. The sciatic nerve is the longest nerve in the body and when compressed, irritated or inflamed can be debilitating.

When does it occur?

Sciatica is often brought on by restrictions within the spine affecting the sciatic nerve and causing referred pain. Restrictions in the pelvis could cause a tightening in the gluteal muscles putting pressure directly on the sciatic nerve.

Sciatica can also be caused by more serious issues which is why it is important to consult a physiotherapist if you notice any referred pain in the leg. It may not always be a biomechanical or disc related issue that causes sciatica which is why its important it is diagnosed correctly.

Sciatica is most commonly preceded by a few weeks of back pain before the leg pain becomes worse than the back pain. In severe cases, it can damage nerves and leg reflexes and cause muscle atrophy of the lower leg most noticeably in the calf.

Often people wait until the pain is unbearable to consult with a physiotherapist. It is important to consult a professional when the pain initially begins as sciatica can cause long-term damage which means longer treatment and longer recovery times.

Sciatica Treatments
Sciatica can have numerous sources thus there are a number of Physiotherapy treatments, none of which involve drugs or surgery. Techniques we use include manual therapies (MT) including muscle energy technique (MET), core rehabilitation (CR), dry needling, soft tissue techniques (STT), trigger point therapy (TPT) and home exercise regime (HEP).

Consult one of our Physiotherapists to review your complete medical history and perform a thorough physical examination to determine the cause of your sciatica.

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Dry Needling, IMS Saanich Peninsula

What is Dry Needling?

Dry Needling is a specialised form of treatment that we use for reducing your pain and inflammation. Your trigger points are targeted with acupuncture needles to treat your pain, muscle tension, injury, and dysfunction. Dry Needling treatment is highly effective and you will often feel immediate pain relief as your muscles relax.

Common injuries treated with Dry Needling

Sports Injuries
Headaches & Migraine
Tennis Elbow
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Achilles Tendonitis
TMJ Pain
Muscle Tears/Strains/Tightness
Bursitis
Plantar Fasciitis
Arthritis
Hip & Knee Pain

 

How does Dry Needling work?

Needles are usually used to target painful trigger points in muscles. The penetration of the needle causes a micro-trauma that increases blood flow and alters the chemical balance in the muscle, assisting with muscle relaxation and healing.
The stimulation of pain receptors also causes the body to release opioids (e.g. endorphins). These are natural pain relievers in your brain. Their release provides further pain relief to you.

Your muscle may respond with a twitch response to the needle stimulation. This is a highly effective form of dry needling treatment and you often feel immediate benefits from this form of release. Your muscle releases tension and lengthens. Substance p, a pain chemical in your body, as well as inflammatory chemicals are eliminated around your trigger point. Flushing out these nasty chemicals can provide a longer lasting pain relief.

How is Dry Needling different to Acupuncture?

Acupuncture generally refers to the traditional Chinese medicine which is based on stimulating the flow of Chi (energy) through the meridians of the body, whereas Dry Needling is based on anatomical and neurophysiological principles. While the dry needles are the same and many of the ideas behind acupuncture are still applicable, the principles behind the use of Needling are very different.
Often people may use the term acupuncture when referring to Dry Needling so if you have had acupuncture in the past it could have been Dry Needles.

Is Dry Needling Physiotherapy safe?

Dry Needling Physio is very safe. There are certain factors that may make you unsuitable for Needling or that require extra care to be taken (e.g. Diabetes) but your Physio will consider these. All dry needles are sterile and used once before being disposed of safely in a sharps container.

Will Dry Needling Hurt?

One of the great advantages of Dry Needles over deep tissue massage for muscle release is that there is generally less pain both during and after treatment.
Most people don’t feel the insertion of the dry needle. When the needle penetrates the trigger point, you may feel an initial twitch or deep ache that quickly settles to become a light dull ache, warmth, heaviness or nothing at all. This is far better than the constant feeling associated with a firm massage that would be required to achieve an equal effect.

After Dry Needling Physio treatment there is often no or little soreness. Sometimes you may feel slightly tight, sore or an ache for a short time (up to 1-2 days). This again is invariably much less that than felt after massage and soft tissues techniques.

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Physiotherapy For Back Pain

Physiotherapy For Back Pain

Physiotherapy For Back Pain


Back problems are the third most common reasons for taking time off work behind the common headaches and colds and are also the second most common reason people go and see their GP. It is believed that approximately 8 in 10 people in western countries suffer from some form of back pain at least occasionally.

Back pain or back ache is a symptom that can arise from many causes including arthritis, muscle and ligament strains, disc lesions, osteoporosis, sciatica and stress. Many cases of upper and low back pain and sore backs in general are caused by stresses on the muscles and ligaments that support the spine. Back pain affects patients of in the neck (cervical spine), mid back (thoracic spine) and lower back (lumbar spine).

At Saanich Physio we deal with a high volume of cases of back pain/injuries and have a proven track record to providing good relief! Our staff here are specially trained in dealing with back related issues whereby digital spinal analysis, X-rays and a comprehensive physical exam are utilized to determine the exact cause of the back pain. We know that everyone is different and therefore we tailor a management program that best suits you! A ‘generic’ treatment formula simply won’t work if you want to stop your pain from coming back.

Here at Saanich Physio we also take a research based ‘holistic’ approach to one’s back problems; as such we also consider and give advice on lifestyle factors that can contribute to back pain. Majority of cases of back pain are aggravated by lifestyle factors, including lack of exercise, schoolbags, being overweight/obese, sedentary lifestyles, poor posture, stress and bad work practices. In relation to obesity – we can also provide superior quality weight loss supplements to assist in this area. We address all of the contributing factors to prevent the pain in your back from coming back for good. Many back pain ailments can be addressed easily and quickly but those with serious and chronic back pain often benefit from an ongoing maintenance program.

Physiotherapy to prevent relapses and worsening of symptoms

Simply, our Back Program is a tailored treatment program to address the exact cause of your problems and to get you back to your favourite activities fast! So if your back is holding you back from sport, occupation and other activities or you just simply have pain whilst sitting or getting in/out of your car then our Better Back Program may be the answer for you!

Our Back Program involves an initial assessment with one of our highly skilled physiotherapists. You will also receive a detailed report at the beginning and conclusion of your back therapy to show your progress and your family doctor and relevant specialists will receive a copy also so that everyone in your medical team helps you move towards being fit and painfree.

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Exercise more for brain health!

Exercise more for brain health!

 

People who exercise have better mental fitness, and a new imaging study from UC Davis Health System shows why. Intense exercise increases levels of two common neurotransmitters — glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA — that are responsible for chemical messaging within the brain.

Published in this week’s issue of The Journal of Neuroscience, the finding offers new insights into brain metabolism and why exercise could become an important part of treating depression and other neuropsychiatric disorders linked with deficiencies in neurotransmitters, which drive communications between the brain cells that regulate physical and emotional health.

“Major depressive disorder is often characterized by depleted glutamate and GABA, which return to normal when mental health is restored,” said study lead author Richard Maddock, professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. “Our study shows that exercise activates the metabolic pathway that replenishes these neurotransmitters.”

The research also helps solve a persistent question about the brain, an energy-intensive organ that consumes a lot of fuel in the form of glucose and other carbohydrates during exercise. What does it do with that extra fuel?

“From a metabolic standpoint, vigorous exercise is the most demanding activity the brain encounters, much more intense than calculus or chess, but nobody knows what happens with all that energy,” Maddock said. “Apparently, one of the things it’s doing is making more neurotransmitters.”

The striking change in how the brain uses fuel during exercise has largely been overlooked in brain health research. While the new findings account for a small part of the brain’s energy consumption during exercise, they are an important step toward understanding the complexity of brain metabolism. The research also hints at the negative impact sedentary lifestyles might have on brain function, along with the role the brain might play in athletic endurance.

“It is not clear what causes people to ‘hit the wall’ or get suddenly fatigued when exercising,” Maddock said. “We often think of this point in terms of muscles being depleted of oxygen and energy molecules. But part of it may be that the brain has reached its limit.”

To understand how exercise affects the brain, the team studied 38 healthy volunteers. Participants exercised on a stationary bicycle, reaching around 85 percent of their predicted maximum heart rate. To measure glutamate and GABA, the researchers conducted a series of imaging studies using a powerful 3-tesla MRI to detect nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, which can identify several compounds based on the magnetic behavior of hydrogen atoms in molecules.

The researchers measured GABA and glutamate levels in two different parts of the brain immediately before and after three vigorous exercise sessions lasting between eight and 20 minutes, and made similar measurements for a control group that did not exercise. Glutamate or GABA levels increased in the participants who exercised, but not among the non-exercisers. Significant increases were found in the visual cortex, which processes visual information, and the anterior cingulate cortex, which helps regulate heart rate, some cognitive functions and emotion. While these gains trailed off over time, there was some evidence of longer-lasting effects.

“There was a correlation between the resting levels of glutamate in the brain and how much people exercised during the preceding week,” Maddock said. “It’s preliminary information, but it’s very encouraging.”

These findings point to the possibility that exercise could be used as an alternative therapy for depression. This could be especially important for patients under age 25, who sometimes have more side effects from selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), anti-depressant medications that adjust neurotransmitter levels.

For follow-up studies, Maddock and the team hope to test whether a less-intense activity, such as walking, offers similar brain benefits. They would also like to use their exercise-plus-imaging method on a study of patients with depression to determine the types of exercise that offer the greatest benefit.

“We are offering another view on why regular physical activity may be important to prevent or treat depression,” Maddock said. “Not every depressed person who exercises will improve, but many will. It’s possible that we can help identify the patients who would most benefit from an exercise prescription.”

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