All Posts tagged foot pain

Osteoarthritis treatment

Osteoarthritis treatment

There is a common belief that there is not much you can do for osteoarthritis because the joint damage has already occurred and can’t be reversed. However it is often the inflammation of the tissue surrounding the joint and instability from the weakened tissues that lead to pain from an arthritic joint.

Our physiotherapists may be able to help you decrease the inflammation and pain around the joint and get you moving again. Here is some information about osteoarthritis and how we can help.

What is osteoarthritis?

Arthritis is a name for a group of conditions that cause damage to the joints in our body, usually causing pain and stiffness

Osteoarthritis is one of these conditions and it affects the whole joint, including bone, cartilage, ligaments and muscles

It is most prevalent in the joints of the hips, knees, neck, lower back, fingers and big toe, but can occur in any joint

It is degeneration of the joint structures, namely the cartilage (protective cushioning on the bony surfaces) and its underlying bone surfaces
Bony growths or spurs commonly known as osteophytes are common in osteoarthritis
Ligaments and muscles around the joint also deteriorate in osteoarthritis
It normally affects a joint on one side of the body i.e. it doesn’t normally occur bilaterally like other arthritic conditions

There are other arthritic conditions you may have heard of such as rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.

Signs and symptoms

Joint pain
Joint stiffness
Swelling of the joints
Symptoms usually develop and worsen gradually over months or years
Affecting ability to carry out normal daily activities
Clicking/grinding in the joint
Loss of flexibility in a joint
What causes osteoarthritis?
Previous joint trauma/injury
Being overweight greatly increases your risk
High joint stress/repetitive use/heavy loads
There is an increase risk as you age and there is more ‘wear and tear’ on the joints

Diagnosis

Arthritis can be diagnosed by taking a thorough history and physical examination
X-ray can help confirm a diagnosis – you may need to see your doctor to get a referral

Treatment

Our physiotherapists can help you with:
Strength and exercise programme
Joint mobilisation/soft tissue techniques
Hydrotherapy
Aids or braces
Education
Weight loss programme
Medication and joint supplements – your doctor can guide you on the best options
Surgical options such as joint replacement
Pre-operative rehabilitation has been shown to improve outcomes post-operatively, so if you are requiring surgery come and find out how you can help speed up your recovery with pre-hab

Some hints for the colder months

Cold weather can exacerbate joint pain and joint stiffness. Remembering a few common sense tips can help people with osteoarthritis survive cold weather:
Dress warmly and layer up
Exercise indoors to stay motivated and warmer
Use a heated pool for exercise – talk to your physiotherapist for local options and classes
Ensure your vitamin D levels are adequate
You don’t have to wait for the warmer months to reduce pain associated with osteoarthritis! Book an appointment with a physiotherapist online 24/7,

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Sore feet? Plantar fasciitis relief!

Sore feet? Plantar fasciitis relief!

Plantar fasciitis is inflammation of the plantar fascia and is the most common cause of heel pain. The plantar fascia is the thick band of connective tissue under the foot that runs from the heel bone at the back of your foot to the toes at the front. It essentially acts like a sling to support the arch of your foot.

What causes Plantar Fasciitis?
There are a number of causes including:
Age as it is more common in middle-aged people due to ‘sagging’ of the arch of the foot, but can occur in younger people who put a lot of load through their feet.Weaknesses can occur in the muscles that support the arch of the foot, which causes the plantar fascia to take an increased load which can irritate
Poor bio-mechanics can contribute to plantar fasciitis i.e. having flat feet or high archesWeight gain or excess weight can put extra load on the plantar fascia, irritating .
the tissues; this can also occur from the weight gain during pregnancy
Repetitive loading i.e. high level sports or working on your feet
Poor support from footwear i.e. worn or ill-fitting shoes
Arthritic foot joints can irritate the plantar fascia
Diabetic people have an increased chance of suffering from plantar fasciitis

Signs and Symptoms of Plantar Fasciitis
Pain at the base of the foot near the heel with weight-bearing
More pain after getting out of bed, or after prolonged sitting
Heel pain will be worse with the first few steps and will gradually improve as you move more

Diagnosis
Generally your physiotherapist will be able to diagnose plantar fasciitis from your history, symptoms and a clinical examination.

Treatment
Calf stretches often give relief to sufferers – it is important to stretch both calf muscles, so stretch with a straight leg and also a bent leg. Hold each stretch for 30 secs and repeat twice. Try to do this at least morning and night every day.
Freeze some water in an old water bottle and roll the bottom of your foot up and down on this.
Taping can offer you some relief while you are doing your exercises to off-load the plantar fascia.
Strengthening is an important component of treatment for plantar fasciitis as it improves the ability of the foot and ankle muscles to support the arch of your foot hence off-loading the plantar fascia.

Book an appointment with one of our physiotherapists who can help you with ideas for strengthening exercises to help ease the pain caused by plantar fasciitis.

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Foot Pain? Strengthen your foot ‘core’

Foot Pain? Strengthen your foot ‘core’

As your cold-weather footwear makes the seasonal migration from the back of your closet to replace summer’s flip flops and bare feet, don’t underestimate the benefits of padding around naked from the ankles down.

Barefoot activities can greatly improve balance and posture and prevent common injuries like shin splints, plantar fasciitis, stress fractures, bursitis, and tendonitis in the Achilles tendon, according to Patrick McKeon, a professor in Ithaca College’s School of Health Sciences and Human Performance.

The small, often overlooked muscles in the feet that play a vital but underappreciated role in movement and stability. Their role is similar to that of the core muscles in the abdomen.

“If you say ‘core stability,’ everyone sucks in their bellybutton,” he said. Part of the reason why is about appearance, but it’s also because a strong core is associated with good fitness. The comparison between feet and abs is intentional on McKeon’s part; he wants people to take the health of their “foot core” just as seriously.

The foot core feedback loop

McKeon describes a feedback cycle between the larger “extrinsic” muscles of the foot and leg, the smaller “intrinsic” muscles of the foot, and the neural connections that send information from those muscle sets to the brain.

“Those interactions become a very powerful tool for us,” he said. When that feedback loop is broken, though, it can lead to the overuse injuries that plague many an athlete and weekend warrior alike.

Shoes are the chief culprit of that breakdown, according to McKeon. “When you put a big sole underneath, you put a big dampening effect on that information. There’s a missing link that connects the body with the environment,” he said.

Muscles serve as the primary absorbers of force for the body. Without the nuanced information provided by the small muscles of the foot, the larger muscles over-compensate and over-exert past the point of exhaustion and the natural ability to repair. When the extrinsic muscles are no longer able to absorb the forces of activity, those forces are instead transferred to the bones, tendons, and ligaments, which leads to overuse injuries.

It’s not that McKeon is opposed to footwear. “Some shoes are very good, from the standpoint of providing support. But the consequence of that support, about losing information from the foot, is what we see the effects of [in overuse injuries].”

Strengthening the foot core

The simplest way to reintroduce the feedback provided by the small muscles of the foot is to shed footwear when possible. McKeon says activities like Pilates, yoga, martial arts, some types of dance, etc. are especially beneficial.

“Anything that has to deal with changing postures and using the forces that derive from the interaction with the body and the ground [is great for developing foot core strength],” he said.

McKeon also described the short-foot exercise, which targets the small muscles by squeezing the ball of the foot back toward the heel. It’s a subtle motion, and the toes shouldn’t curl when performing it. The exercise can be done anywhere while seated or standing, though he recommends first working with an athletic trainer or physical therapist to get familiar with the movement.

He notes the exercise seems to have especially positive results for patients suffering from ankle sprain, shin splints, and plantar fasciitis. It’s even been shown to improve the strain suffered by individuals with flat feet.

The payoff could be more than just physical, as there could be financial savings. With strong feet, McKeon suggests that — depending on the activity — consumers may not need to invest hundreds of dollars in slick, well-marketed athletic sneakers (though he doesn’t recommend going for the cheapest of cheap sneakers, either). People with a strong foot core can actively rely on the foot to provide proper support, rather than passively relying on the shoes alone.

“You might be able to get a $50 pair of basketball shoes that don’t have the typical support that you’d expect. Because you have strong feet, you’re just using the shoes to protect the feet and grip the ground,” he said.

The easiest way to get started on strengthening the small muscles of the foot, though, is to kick off your shoes in indoor environments.

“The more people can go barefoot, such as at home or the office, is a really good thing,” McKeon said.

Ithaca College. “Going barefoot: Strong ‘foot core’ could prevent plantar fasciitis, shin splints, and other common injuries.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 November 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/11/151117181929

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Foot Pain Innovation: Create custom insoles from a smartphone!

Foot Pain Innovation: Create custom insoles from a smartphone!

The Instituto de Biomecánica (Biomechanics Institute-IBV) has developed SUNfeet, insoles which are customized to the anatomy of the user’s foot, which increase the comfort of footwear and reduce pain and fatigue in the feet. This product is now available in Europe.

These insoles display an innovative technology used in their development: a combination of a system for capturing and digitizing the shape of the foot which is easy and intuitive for the user via smartphone and a 3-D printing system which allows insoles to be manufactured in a totally personalized manner.

SUNfeet arose from the idea of combining the latest trends in health, technology and fashion to develop exclusive insoles which make footwear more comfortable and care for the feet, thus promoting an active lifestyle.

The SUNfeet smartphone app was designed for the 3Dcapture system, making it possible to obtain the shape of the foot extremely accurately and conveniently from any location.

The process is very simple: while seated, the user places the bare foot on one side of a sheet of paper. The app itself will guide him/her until three images of each foot are obtained. The files are then sent to a server which reconstructs the foot in 3-D, using pattern recognition and shape analysis algorithms. The 3-D image of the foot can be displayed on screen in less than one minute. Finally, the system assigns a unique identification code to each image, which will subsequently be used to design the customized insole.

At the same time, this technology is also present in the manufacturing process through 3-D printing, opening the way for more creative designs and the customization of the functional properties of resistance and flexibility, adapting them to the specific needs of each user and activity.

The power and precision of SUNfeet technology allow for optimal customization: not only are the insoles adapted to the anatomy of the foot, but also to the characteristics and lifestyle of each user. With this in mind, three different models of insole have been created (Sports, Casual and Elegant), taking into account the type of activity and the characteristics of the footwear in order to select the most suitable materials and thicknesses. Thus, the impact cushioning, energy return and pressure distribution requirements are adapted to each use and to the characteristics of each individual.

Museum Exhibition

The Instituto de Biomecánica (Biomechanics Institute — IBV) has introduced, as part of the Science Museum “Príncipe Felipe” of Valencia, this SUNfeet technology, incorporated as a new module of the exhibition “We Take Care About Your Quality of Life.”

IBV director, Javier Sánchez Lacuesta, reminded those present that “this exhibition -promoted by CVIDA association- was developed by IBV in collaboration with the Science Museum and opened in October 2007 in order to make available to the citizen technologies, products and services that take care of their health and wellbeing. This is an interactive show in which the visitor can check their skills in different environments and attractions.”

The foot care is essential to reduce hassles that come to limit the way of life. Using comfort insoles helps keep feet healthy during daily activity. SUNfeet combines a precise system of capturing and digitizing the foot and a 3D printing system that allows develop fully customized insoles.

The user can select the insole that best suits his lifestyle: Casual insoles for continued use shoes that achieve comfort and reduce foot fatigue; Elegant insoles that fit with most elegant and formal shoes; and Sports insoles that improve performance and help to prevent injuries.

Juan Carlos Gonzalez, IBV Clothing Director, showed attendees the performance of this system, highlighting the ease of use, accuracy when carrying out the capture of the foot and versatility of the system that allows getting perfectly tailored insoles to the needs and characteristics of the user and the function to which they are intended.

Asociación RUVID. “SUNfeet technology for the customization of comfort insoles using a smartphone.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 October 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151019072208.htm>.

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