All Posts tagged massage therapy

937 strides per km..no wonder we get calf pain!

937 strides per km..no wonder we get calf pain!

A very common running injury is a calf strain or a tear. We have two main calf muscles, Gastrocnemius and Soleus, which are under repetitive load when we run. There are two reasons for this, the first one is to absorb the shock of our body weight during landing, and the second is to help move us forward into our next stride.

When we run, we take on average 937 strides per km. Obviously any weakness in the calf complex, or elsewhere in your lower limb or pelvis, will affect your running technique. Any muscle imbalance in your kinetic chain (above and below the calf) will lead to an increased load on the calf and predispose you to injury, strain or tear.
Just as your calf is designed to absorb shock and propel us forwards, the muscles above and below the calf are stabilising muscles. These are responsible for keeping the ankle, knee and hip joints stable during movement, so that your calf can carry out its main function. However, if your muscles aren’t up to the job they were designed for, particularly at the foot and ankle complex, the calf will begin to try and take on a stabilizing role. It isn’t designed to do this so it gets overworked or injured. A common example is over pronation of your foot (rolling inwards) or weak gluteal muscles causing excessive inward rotation of the knee.

A lack of a warm-up session is often a reason why many of us sustain calf injuries. The warmer the muscle, the more elastic it becomes. As we get older, there becomes a decrease in elasticity towards our tendons and muscles, causing an increase risk in calf strains for those more senior to running. Warming down after a run with calf stretches helps maintain the elasticity in your calf muscles.

Don’t forget that dehydration affects your muscle function by reducing blood flow to your muscles and decreasing muscle elasticity, flexibility and endurance. So stay hydrated.

Properly fitted footwear that isn’t worn out and provides adequate cushioning is also an important factor to consider when avoiding calf strain. Calf compression socks or long skins can also assist with keeping muscles warm and increasing circulation.
What to do if you have calf strain or tear?

Initially, the Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation (R.I.C.E) principal should be followed. Book an appointment with a Physiotherapist for assessment and treatment of your injury so we can start your individual rehabilitation programme. We may refer you to have a scan of your injured calf muscle if we suspect a grade 2 or 3 strain.

Approximate timescales for rest are;
3 weeks for a Grade 1 strain
4-6 weeks for a Grade 2 strain
Grade 3 tears will most likely require surgery followed by a 12-week rehabilitation programme.

As with any injury, it is very important to avoid secondary injuries that occur through compensatory movement patterns. These may have become a habit during the injured period. All the more reason to get self assessed early to avoid this from occurring.

The rehabilitation period is also a good opportunity to target those areas that often get ignored in our weekly training routines. Core stability and gluteal muscles are a great place to focus on when running activity is restricted. At Saanichton Physiotherapy and Sports clinic our Physiotherapists will design a programme to suit your individual needs.

Research conducted has found that the stronger these muscles are, the more likely you will gain a successful outcome in not only injury recovery, injury prevention, but also importantly your performance.

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Post running muscle soreness?

Post running muscle soreness?

Whether you are a first time runner or not you will be on a runners high for finishing your event.

The key to a good post running event recovery is what you do in the first few days after running. The outcome of not following through on a good recovery include, risk of injury, increased fatigue, mood swings and extreme muscle soreness.

At Saanichton Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic we advise on the following tips to prepare you for your post running recovery.
Recovery Advice:

Drink lots of water

Many of us don’t realise how much fluid can be lost during running. During your running event the wind evaporates a large portion of your sweat – this means that a lot of the fluid you lose is invisible, but can add up to 1-2 litres or water depending on the heat. Some of the signs to watch our for in post running dehydration can be headaches, concentrated urine which appears darker yellow in colour and feelings of being extremely exhausted. A swollen tongue and cracks/indentations in your lips can also be signs of a dehydrated body.

Perform a warm down routine

Warming down will make a huge difference to how your body responds in the first 1-2 days after your running event. This is when DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) starts to rear its ugly head. So it’s vitally important to warm down even if you do not feel like it at the time. Stay on your feet and keep moving and walking around the race precinct for about 5-10mins. Do a few light lower limb stretches of your quadriceps, hamstrings and calves immediately after the running event and keep increasing your stretching routine over the next few days. If muscle soreness or tightness is still present

Book a massage or some hands on physiotherapy

At physiotherapy we encourage you to pre- book your post race remedial massage with our Massage Therapist or hands on physiotherapy & dry needling appointment in the first 1-2 days after your event. This will really assist your muscles to re-lengthen and decrease soreness after all the hard work they did getting you over the finishing line.

Wear compression garments

Wear your compression socks, pants or shorts when you get home or even immediately post –race if you can get to them easily. Wearing these can significantly reduce your muscle soreness. If soreness or muscle tightness still persists…7 days later have a massage or hands on physiotherapy appointment

It will usually takes 1-2 days for DOMS to kick in. Getting that second remedial massage or hands on physiotherapy &/or dry needling appointment a week after a major running event like the Corporate cup can work wonders. This is quite important if you are looking to continue to run or participate in another event soon (eg the following weekend or fortnight). Our hands on Physiotherapists and massage therapists will work over any residual tight knots and bands that developed over the course of your running event.

A great way to encourage recovery is to lie with your legs resting up on a wall. This can facilitate blood flow and lymphatic drainage. Adopting this position can improve your mood and energy levels by bringing blood back to the brain. You can stretch in this position for up to 15mins. Move your gluteals closer to the wall for comfort and to stretch your hamstring.

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Sore feet? Plantar fasciitis relief!

Sore feet? Plantar fasciitis relief!

Plantar fasciitis is inflammation of the plantar fascia and is the most common cause of heel pain. The plantar fascia is the thick band of connective tissue under the foot that runs from the heel bone at the back of your foot to the toes at the front. It essentially acts like a sling to support the arch of your foot.

What causes Plantar Fasciitis?
There are a number of causes including:
Age as it is more common in middle-aged people due to ‘sagging’ of the arch of the foot, but can occur in younger people who put a lot of load through their feet.Weaknesses can occur in the muscles that support the arch of the foot, which causes the plantar fascia to take an increased load which can irritate
Poor bio-mechanics can contribute to plantar fasciitis i.e. having flat feet or high archesWeight gain or excess weight can put extra load on the plantar fascia, irritating .
the tissues; this can also occur from the weight gain during pregnancy
Repetitive loading i.e. high level sports or working on your feet
Poor support from footwear i.e. worn or ill-fitting shoes
Arthritic foot joints can irritate the plantar fascia
Diabetic people have an increased chance of suffering from plantar fasciitis

Signs and Symptoms of Plantar Fasciitis
Pain at the base of the foot near the heel with weight-bearing
More pain after getting out of bed, or after prolonged sitting
Heel pain will be worse with the first few steps and will gradually improve as you move more

Diagnosis
Generally your physiotherapist will be able to diagnose plantar fasciitis from your history, symptoms and a clinical examination.

Treatment
Calf stretches often give relief to sufferers – it is important to stretch both calf muscles, so stretch with a straight leg and also a bent leg. Hold each stretch for 30 secs and repeat twice. Try to do this at least morning and night every day.
Freeze some water in an old water bottle and roll the bottom of your foot up and down on this.
Taping can offer you some relief while you are doing your exercises to off-load the plantar fascia.
Strengthening is an important component of treatment for plantar fasciitis as it improves the ability of the foot and ankle muscles to support the arch of your foot hence off-loading the plantar fascia.

Book an appointment with one of our physiotherapists who can help you with ideas for strengthening exercises to help ease the pain caused by plantar fasciitis.

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Shoulder Pain? What should you?

Shoulder Pain? What should you?

Ok so your shoulder has been hurting for a while and your Physio has diagnosed you with a Rotator Cuff injury. What the hell is a rotator cuff? How do I get rid of this pain!?!
Firstly, the rotator cuff is a group of four muscles which help to stabilise the shoulder. The shoulder is a ball and socket joint, similar to the hip, however the shoulder has a shallow socket in comparison. What the shoulder lacks in stability it makes up for in mobility, generally speaking, a healthy shoulder has almost 360 degrees of movement so it needs help from the surrounding muscles to maintain stability through movement. There is also another structure inside the shoulder joint called the labrum, which helps to deepen the joint and provide stability.

How does my Rotator Cuff get injured?

Rotator cuff injuries usually occur either acutely (immediate sharp pain) or over time (gradual increasing dull ache). Acute rotator cuff injuries can often involve a tearing of the rotator cuff tendons and leads to pain and weakness of the shoulder. Gradual onset of shoulder pain can be associated with repetitive overhead movements, which can lead to smaller tears in the tendon and inflammation around this area.
One of the main factors which can influence shoulder pain is the position of the shoulder. The further forward the humeral head (the ball) sits in the socket, the more compression of the tendon occurs and leads to injury.

How can I fix it?

Having your shoulder properly assessed by a qualified Physiotherapist is the first step in diagnosing a Rotator Cuff injury. Investigations such as Ultrasound or MRI may be relevant if the Physiotherapist feels there is significant injury. For acute rotator cuff tears, a small period of immobilisation in a sling or in some cases, just with some tape, will help settle the pain. Once pain and inflammation are under control then you need to get the shoulder moving and gradually strengthen the rotator cuff tendons and surrounding muscles.
For the gradual onset type shoulder pain there is usually a biomechanical cause for the loading of the tendons. Thorough assessment by a qualified Physiotherapist is a must to get to the bottom of your shoulder pain. Initially settling down the pain and inflammation around the tendons and encouraging gentle pain free movement is the first step. Then gradually increasing the load in the shoulder until the strength is back to normal

How can I prevent this from happening in the future?

Continuation of the strength and flexibility exercises prescribed by your Physiotherapist will help decrease the likelihood of re-occurrence. Identifying aggravating positions i.e. overhead movements or reaching in awkward positions will also decrease the likelihood of re-injury. If your job is a relatively sedentary and requires hours of sitting at a time, trying to break up your day with standing/walking will help, also an ergonomic assessment to ensure your workspace is properly set up to suit you will help ease the stress on your shoulders/neck.

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