All Posts tagged osteopathic

Chronic Back Pain? Don’t take opioids, try Physical Therapy

Chronic Back Pain? Don’t take opioids, try Physical Therapy

Millions of people take opioids for chronic back pain, but many of them get limited relief while experiencing side effects and worrying about the stigma associated with taking them.
More than 100 million people in the United States suffer from chronic pain, and those with chronic low back pain are more likely than patients with other types of pain to be prescribed opioids. Unfortunately, these medications are addictive and can cause side effects, ranging from drowsiness to breathing problems.

“Patients are increasingly aware that opioids are problematic, but don’t know there are alternative treatment options,” said Asokumar Buvanendran, M.D., lead author of the study, director of orthopedic anesthesia and vice chair for research at Rush University, Chicago, and vice chair of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Committee on Pain Medicine. “While some patients may benefit from opioids for severe pain for a few days after an injury, physicians need to wean their patients off them and use multi-modal therapies instead.”

In the study, 2,030 people with low back pain completed a survey about treatment. Nearly half (941) were currently taking opioids. When asked how successful the opioids were at relieving their pain, only 13 percent said “very successful.” The most common answer — given by 44 percent — was “somewhat successful” and 31 percent said “moderately successful.” Twelve percent said “not successful.”

Seventy-five percent said they experienced side effects including constipation (65 percent), sleepiness (37 percent), cognitive issues (32 percent) and dependence (29 percent).

Respondents also had concerns about the stigma associated with taking opioids. Forty-one percent said they felt judged by using opioids. While 68 percent of the patients had also been treated with antidepressants, only 19 percent felt a stigma from using those.

A major pharmaceutical company recently agreed to disclose in its promotional material that narcotic painkillers carry serious risk of addiction and not to promote opioids for unapproved, “off-label” uses such as long-term back pain. Researchers also note a lack of solid studies on the effectiveness of opioids in treating back pain beyond 12 weeks.

Patients with chronic low back pain, persistent pain lasting more than three months, should see a pain medicine specialist who uses an approach that combines a variety of treatments that may be more beneficial, said Dr. Buvanendran. These treatments include physical therapy, bracing, interventional procedures such as nerve blocks, nerve ablation techniques or implantable devices, other medications such as anti-inflammatories and alternative therapies such as biofeedback and massage, he said.

Story Source:

American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). “Many back pain patients get limited relief from opioids and worry about taking them, survey shows.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 October 2016.

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Post running muscle soreness?

Post running muscle soreness?

Whether you are a first time runner or not you will be on a runners high for finishing your event.

The key to a good post running event recovery is what you do in the first few days after running. The outcome of not following through on a good recovery include, risk of injury, increased fatigue, mood swings and extreme muscle soreness.

At Saanichton Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic we advise on the following tips to prepare you for your post running recovery.
Recovery Advice:

Drink lots of water

Many of us don’t realise how much fluid can be lost during running. During your running event the wind evaporates a large portion of your sweat – this means that a lot of the fluid you lose is invisible, but can add up to 1-2 litres or water depending on the heat. Some of the signs to watch our for in post running dehydration can be headaches, concentrated urine which appears darker yellow in colour and feelings of being extremely exhausted. A swollen tongue and cracks/indentations in your lips can also be signs of a dehydrated body.

Perform a warm down routine

Warming down will make a huge difference to how your body responds in the first 1-2 days after your running event. This is when DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) starts to rear its ugly head. So it’s vitally important to warm down even if you do not feel like it at the time. Stay on your feet and keep moving and walking around the race precinct for about 5-10mins. Do a few light lower limb stretches of your quadriceps, hamstrings and calves immediately after the running event and keep increasing your stretching routine over the next few days. If muscle soreness or tightness is still present

Book a massage or some hands on physiotherapy

At physiotherapy we encourage you to pre- book your post race remedial massage with our Massage Therapist or hands on physiotherapy & dry needling appointment in the first 1-2 days after your event. This will really assist your muscles to re-lengthen and decrease soreness after all the hard work they did getting you over the finishing line.

Wear compression garments

Wear your compression socks, pants or shorts when you get home or even immediately post –race if you can get to them easily. Wearing these can significantly reduce your muscle soreness. If soreness or muscle tightness still persists…7 days later have a massage or hands on physiotherapy appointment

It will usually takes 1-2 days for DOMS to kick in. Getting that second remedial massage or hands on physiotherapy &/or dry needling appointment a week after a major running event like the Corporate cup can work wonders. This is quite important if you are looking to continue to run or participate in another event soon (eg the following weekend or fortnight). Our hands on Physiotherapists and massage therapists will work over any residual tight knots and bands that developed over the course of your running event.

A great way to encourage recovery is to lie with your legs resting up on a wall. This can facilitate blood flow and lymphatic drainage. Adopting this position can improve your mood and energy levels by bringing blood back to the brain. You can stretch in this position for up to 15mins. Move your gluteals closer to the wall for comfort and to stretch your hamstring.

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Sciatica: A real pain in the butt!

Sciatica: A real pain in the butt!

Sciatica is the term given to describe symptoms caused by irritation of the sciatic nerve. Contrary to popular belief, it is NOT a medical diagnosis. The sciatic nerve is formed from spinal nerves exiting the lower back, and runs through the buttock and down the back of both legs.  Any pain or symptom experienced along this nerve is referred to as ‘sciatica’.

Common symptoms include:

One sided pain that may be felt in the lower back, buttock, hip and leg. It may also radiate to the foot and/or toes
Pain that can be described as severe, burning, sharp, tingling, searing
Difficulty walking
Weakness and or numbness in the leg, foot and toes

The problem causing sciatica is actually the correct diagnosis. Common causes include:

Lumbar disc herniation
Degenerative disc disease, osteoarthritis
Spondylolisthesis
Spinal stenosis (narrowing of the spine)
Nerve entrapment e.g. from tight musculature surround the lumbosacral area
Muscle imbalances
Most sciatic pain is treated and managed with conservative treatment. As sciatica can be caused by a range of different issues as described above, it is important that an appropriate assessment is performed to provide specific treatment. Not all sciatic pain is the same!

Our physiotherapists will provide a range of treatment which may include:
Advice and education about the condition and how to manage the symptoms, generally exercise and staying active rather than bed rest
Strengthening exercises for supporting muscles e.g. lower back, core, hip
Stretching exercises for tight muscles
Hands on treatment for stiff joints and/or tight muscles
Dry needling

An individualised exercises program for self-management and future prevention.
Most cases of sciatica resolve by themselves within six weeks to three months. Sciatica can also be caused by narrowing of the nerve tunnel between discs due to osteoarthritis. Elderly people who suffer from disk degeneration as a consequence of ageing tend to be troubled the most by sciatica.

If sciatic pain is bothering you, make an appointment with one of our physiotherapists to aid in a correct diagnosis for optimal management.

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Osteoarthritis treatment

Osteoarthritis treatment

There is a common belief that there is not much you can do for osteoarthritis because the joint damage has already occurred and can’t be reversed. However it is often the inflammation of the tissue surrounding the joint and instability from the weakened tissues that lead to pain from an arthritic joint.

Our physiotherapists may be able to help you decrease the inflammation and pain around the joint and get you moving again. Here is some information about osteoarthritis and how we can help.

What is osteoarthritis?

Arthritis is a name for a group of conditions that cause damage to the joints in our body, usually causing pain and stiffness

Osteoarthritis is one of these conditions and it affects the whole joint, including bone, cartilage, ligaments and muscles

It is most prevalent in the joints of the hips, knees, neck, lower back, fingers and big toe, but can occur in any joint

It is degeneration of the joint structures, namely the cartilage (protective cushioning on the bony surfaces) and its underlying bone surfaces
Bony growths or spurs commonly known as osteophytes are common in osteoarthritis
Ligaments and muscles around the joint also deteriorate in osteoarthritis
It normally affects a joint on one side of the body i.e. it doesn’t normally occur bilaterally like other arthritic conditions

There are other arthritic conditions you may have heard of such as rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.

Signs and symptoms

Joint pain
Joint stiffness
Swelling of the joints
Symptoms usually develop and worsen gradually over months or years
Affecting ability to carry out normal daily activities
Clicking/grinding in the joint
Loss of flexibility in a joint
What causes osteoarthritis?
Previous joint trauma/injury
Being overweight greatly increases your risk
High joint stress/repetitive use/heavy loads
There is an increase risk as you age and there is more ‘wear and tear’ on the joints

Diagnosis

Arthritis can be diagnosed by taking a thorough history and physical examination
X-ray can help confirm a diagnosis – you may need to see your doctor to get a referral

Treatment

Our physiotherapists can help you with:
Strength and exercise programme
Joint mobilisation/soft tissue techniques
Hydrotherapy
Aids or braces
Education
Weight loss programme
Medication and joint supplements – your doctor can guide you on the best options
Surgical options such as joint replacement
Pre-operative rehabilitation has been shown to improve outcomes post-operatively, so if you are requiring surgery come and find out how you can help speed up your recovery with pre-hab

Some hints for the colder months

Cold weather can exacerbate joint pain and joint stiffness. Remembering a few common sense tips can help people with osteoarthritis survive cold weather:
Dress warmly and layer up
Exercise indoors to stay motivated and warmer
Use a heated pool for exercise – talk to your physiotherapist for local options and classes
Ensure your vitamin D levels are adequate
You don’t have to wait for the warmer months to reduce pain associated with osteoarthritis! Book an appointment with a physiotherapist online 24/7,

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