All Posts tagged physiotherapy

How Can I Prevent Back Pain?

How Can I Prevent Back Pain?

How Can I Prevent Back Pain?

The latest research tells us that often people have never had a physical trauma to cause back pain like a car accident, falling, or lifting something heavy. There are usually a combination of factors that cause back pain which could include overuse, poor posture or other stressors.

Keeping in mind everyone is different, here are some expert tips:

Exercise! you can’t escape it, exercise is important for so many reasons, but a big one is preventing back pain. Muscles are meant to move. If you aren’t in good shape, you’re more likely to hurt your back and feel pain when you do even simple movements, such as getting out of the car. Exercise helps keep your joints fluid and your muscles strong.

Core & glute strength a regular strength-training routine that focuses on training your muscles to work together can help support your spine. Core muscles include your pelvis, lower back, hips and abdomen. Strong, activated glute muscles help protect your back from activities such as lifting a heavy object.

Eat well healthy eating habits can keep your weight down. Being overweight can put added strain on all of your joints, especially your spine.

Posture awareness be aware of how often you slouch over your laptop and iphone when texting. Take the time to take a break from long periods in front of the computer with a simple walk around the block or some hip-flexor stretches.

Reduce stress stress can impact your level of pain. Stress causes you to tense your muscles and constant tension can cause back pain. Take up a hobby or regular activity that helps you relax.

Sleep style for most, sleeping on your back can put pressure on your spine, pop a pillow under your knees to reduce this. If you’re a tummy sleeper, put a pillow under your pelvis. Side sleeping is generally the best way to go (but everyone is different!)

Lower back pain can be debilitating and can have a major effect on your daily life and work activities. Don’t let that happen to you, put in place some positive things today.

Physiotherapists are experts in the assessment of musculoskeletal injuries, especially spinal related pain, that’s why we can help you. We can help you with a strengthening home/gym-program for whole-body awareness, strength and posture improvements.

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Running and Osteoarthritis

Running and Osteoarthritis

Does running accelerate the development of osteoarthritis?

There are so many misconceptions about running and how bad it can be for your joints. You may have heard many friends and family members comment on this and they may have even tried to convince you to stop running and go swimming instead. Here is what the scientific research tells us so far:

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a musculoskeletal condition that involves degeneration of the joints and impact during weightbearing exercise such as running and may contribute to joint loads. There is very little evidence however, that running causes OA in the knees or hips. One study reported in 1985 by Sohn and Micheli compared incidence of hip and knee pain and surgery over 25 years in 504 former cross-country runners. Only 0.8% of the runners needed surgery for OA in this time and the researchers concluded that moderate running (25.4 miles/week on average) was not associated with increased incidence of OA.

In another smaller study of 35 older runners and 38 controls with a mean age of 63 years, researchers looked at progression of OA over 5 years in the hands, lumbar spine and knees (Lane et al. 1993) . They used questionnaires and x-rays as measurement tools. In a span of 5 years, both groups had some participants who developed OA- but found that running did not increase the rate of OA in the knees. They reported that the 12% risk of developing knee OA in their group could be attributed to aging and not to running. In 2008, a group of researchers reported results from a longitudinal study in which 45 long distance runners and 53 non-runners were followed for 21 years. Assessment of their knee X-Rays, revealed that runners did not have a higher risk of developing OA than the non-running control group. They did note however, that the subjects with worse OA on x-ray also had higher BMI (Body Mass Index) and some early arthritic change in their knees at the outset of the study.

Is it better to walk than to run?

It is a common belief that it must be better to walk than to run to protect your joints. In a recent study comparing the effects of running and walking on the development of OA and hip replacement risk, the incidence of hip OA was 2.6% in the running group, compared with 4.7% in the walking group (Williams et al 2013). The percentage of walkers who eventually required a hip replacement was 0.7%, while in the running group, it was lower at 0.3%. Although the incidence is small, the authors suggest the chance of runners developing OA of the hip is less than walkers.
In the same study, Williams and colleagues reinforced that running actually helped keep middle-age weight gain down. As excess weight may correlate with increased risk of developing OA, running may reduce the risks of OA. The relationship between bodyweight and knee OA has been well-established in scientific studies, so running for fitness and keeping your weight under control is much less likely to wear out your knees than being inactive and carrying excess weight.

Is there a limit?

Recent studies have shown that we should be doing 30 minutes of moderate exercise daily to prevent cardiovascular disease and diabetes. But with running, researchers still have not established the exact dosage of runners that has optimal health effects. Hansen and colleagues’ review of the evidence to date reported that the current literature is inconclusive about the possible relationship about running volume and development of OA but suggested that physiotherapists can help runners by correcting gait abnormalities, treating injuries appropriately and encouraging them to keep the BMI down.

We still do not know how much is “too much” for our joints. However, we do know that with age, we expect degenerative changes to occur in the joints whether we run or not. Osteoarthritis is just as common as getting grey hair. The important thing is that we keep the joints as happy and healthy as possible.

How do you start running?

If you are not a runner and would like to start running, walking would be a good way to start and then work your way up to short running intervals and then longer intervals as you improve your fitness and allow time for your body to adapt. Therefore, running in general is not bad for the joints. It does not seem to increase our risk of developing OA in the hips and knees. But the way you run, the way you train and how fast you change your running frequency and distance may play a role in future injuries of the joints.

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Physiotherapy For Back Pain

Physiotherapy For Back Pain

Physiotherapy For Back Pain


Back problems are the third most common reasons for taking time off work behind the common headaches and colds and are also the second most common reason people go and see their GP. It is believed that approximately 8 in 10 people in western countries suffer from some form of back pain at least occasionally.

Back pain or back ache is a symptom that can arise from many causes including arthritis, muscle and ligament strains, disc lesions, osteoporosis, sciatica and stress. Many cases of upper and low back pain and sore backs in general are caused by stresses on the muscles and ligaments that support the spine. Back pain affects patients of in the neck (cervical spine), mid back (thoracic spine) and lower back (lumbar spine).

At Saanich Physio we deal with a high volume of cases of back pain/injuries and have a proven track record to providing good relief! Our staff here are specially trained in dealing with back related issues whereby digital spinal analysis, X-rays and a comprehensive physical exam are utilized to determine the exact cause of the back pain. We know that everyone is different and therefore we tailor a management program that best suits you! A ‘generic’ treatment formula simply won’t work if you want to stop your pain from coming back.

Here at Saanich Physio we also take a research based ‘holistic’ approach to one’s back problems; as such we also consider and give advice on lifestyle factors that can contribute to back pain. Majority of cases of back pain are aggravated by lifestyle factors, including lack of exercise, schoolbags, being overweight/obese, sedentary lifestyles, poor posture, stress and bad work practices. In relation to obesity – we can also provide superior quality weight loss supplements to assist in this area. We address all of the contributing factors to prevent the pain in your back from coming back for good. Many back pain ailments can be addressed easily and quickly but those with serious and chronic back pain often benefit from an ongoing maintenance program.

Physiotherapy to prevent relapses and worsening of symptoms

Simply, our Back Program is a tailored treatment program to address the exact cause of your problems and to get you back to your favourite activities fast! So if your back is holding you back from sport, occupation and other activities or you just simply have pain whilst sitting or getting in/out of your car then our Better Back Program may be the answer for you!

Our Back Program involves an initial assessment with one of our highly skilled physiotherapists. You will also receive a detailed report at the beginning and conclusion of your back therapy to show your progress and your family doctor and relevant specialists will receive a copy also so that everyone in your medical team helps you move towards being fit and painfree.

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Marathon, Half Marathon Race Recovery

Marathon, Half Marathon Race Recovery

Recovery Advice:

Whether you are a first time or seasoned full or half marathon runner, post race you will be on a runners high for finishing your event after many months of running training and preparation. The key to a good post marathon, half marathon or running event recovery is what you do in the first few days after your marathon or running event.

The outcome of not following through on a good recovery include risk of injury, increased fatigue, mood swings and extreme muscle soreness.

At Saanich Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic we advise on the following tips to prepare you for your post race recovery.

 

Drink lots of water

Many of us don’t realise how much fluid can be lost during running. During your running event the wind evaporates a large portion of your sweat – this means that a lot of the fluid you lose is invisible, but can add up to 1-2 litres or water. Some of the signs to watch our for in post running dehydration can be headaches, concentrated urine which appears darker yellow in colour and feelings of being extremely exhausted. A swollen tongue and cracks/indentations in your lips can also be signs of a dehydrated body.

Perform a warm down routine

Warming down will make a huge difference to how your body responds in the first 1-2 days after your running event. This is when DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) starts to rear its ugly head. So it’s vitally important to warm down even if you do not feel like it at the time. Stay on your feet and keep moving and walking around the race precinct for about 5-10mins. Do a few light lower limb stretches of your quadriceps, hamstrings and calves immediately after the marathon or running event and keep increasing your light running routine over the next few days.

Book a massage or some hands on physiotherapy

At Saanich Physiotherapy we encourage you to pre-book your post race remedial massage or hands on physiotherapy and dry needling appointment in the first 1-2 days after your event. This will really assist your muscles to re-lengthen and decrease soreness after all the hard work they did getting you over the finishing line.

                                         Wear compression garments

Wear your compression socks, pants or shorts when you get home or even immediately post-race if you can get to them easily. Wearing these can significantly reduce your muscle soreness.

Seven days later have a massage or hands on physiotherapy appointment

It will usually takes 1-2 days for DOMS to kick in. Getting that second massage or hands on physiotherapy appointment a week after a major running event can work wonders. This is quite important if you are looking to continue to run or participate in another event soon (eg the following weekend or fortnight). Our hands on Physiotherapists and registered massage therapists will work over any residual tight knots and bands that developed over the course of your running event.

Legs up the wall

A great way to encourage recovery is to lie with your legs resting up on a wall. This can facilitate blood flow and lymphatic drainage. Adopting this position can improve your mood and energy levels by bringing blood back to the brain. You can stretch in this position for for up to 15mins. Move your gluteals closer to the wall for comfort and to stretch your hamstrings.

 

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