All Posts tagged Running

Sports Injury Treatment

Sports Injury Treatment

Treatment Protocols have changed significantly when it comes to sports Injuries even though the injuries themselves have remained unchanged in medical textbooks for many years.

Most of the advances in treatment have come about from research lead by exercise physiologists and specialists who monitor and test our elite athletes and of course lets not forget the sharp learning curve provided by good old fashion trial and error.

It wasn’t that long ago a patient booked for knee surgery would be in a cast and asked to rest as much as possible. Medical specialist began to realise that the cast would accelerate atrophy (muscle wasting) of the leg muscles making postoperative recovery a long and unnecessary drawn out.

Nowadays the complete opposite occurs. Instead of resting and immobilising the injured segment, the patient is given a carefully considered treatment plan combined with prescribed rehabilitation exercises, pre and post-operatively.

There are a number of important factors to be considered before any treatment or rehabilitation program is given to minimise aggravation of the healing structures. A poor and inexperienced approach could set back recovery significantly, or worse, contribute to further damage to the recovering tissues.

Our physiotherapists have years of experience treating injuries. They have seen just about every combination of sports injury and treat many elite athletes.

Treating any injury whether it is sports related, work related or just plain bad luck does not change the rehab rules. Each injury is categorised in different phases with goals and criteria to progress through each different phase.

All our rehabilitation exercises are based on best current practices that are evidence-based. Our Physiotherapists clearly set out what type of exercises are appropriate for the current injury level, how many reps, at what intensity and how many times in the day these exercises should be completed.
Combine this approach with his proven treatment protocols gives our patients the best results.

In nearly all cases, treatment is accompanied by a customised exercise rehab program to accelerate recovery and enhance positive long lasting results.

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Biomechanical Running Analysis

Biomechanical Running Analysis

Running Analysis

A Running Analysis at Saanich Physio involves one of our experienced Physiotherapists observing and assessing how you run. We will watch you in real time and also video you, so that we can analyse your form in slow motion.

This kind of analysis is helpful whether you have an injury or if you want to know if you are running with optimal technique. We will explain our findings to you, with analysis of how certain movement patterns or imbalances may contribute to your injury or efficiency as a runner.

We highly recommend this no matter what level of ability you are, whether a beginner, weekend jogger or competitive athlete.

We Are Runners
We feel that in order to understand runners and running injuries, it’s helpful to be a runner yourself. Our Physiotherapists are all keen runners and between them have competed in short and mid distance track events all the way up to half marathons, full marathons and ultra-marathon distances.

Video Analysis
We watch you run in real time, then record you and analyse your form using slow motion video. We will outline how your form compares to the ideal. We will only look to change particular elements of your form if it is impacting on your injury, efficiency or if it will help you prevent injury.

Education
We focus on education, with a clear explanation of our findings and how they impact your body. We work with you to achieve a more efficient running technique.

Results

Our aim is to get you back running as quickly as possible if injury is stopping you. We will provide specifically targeted exercises and a return to running program if needed. Our aim is to help you achieve a stronger form, become more efficient, and prevent injury.

Our experienced Saanich Physiotherapists will analyse your running technique and help you achieve better form to prevent injury and maximise efficiency.
Your Physiotherapist will start by discussing your running program and injury history with you.

They will then video you running. From observing you in real time and also through slow motion recording, they will explain what ideal running form is and how your technique compares.

Based on the findings from the video analysis we can give you specific and individualised cues to help improve your form. You will have a chance within the session to practice this on the treadmill and review your video footage.

A biomechanical assessment may also be performed to test your joints and muscles for flexibility and strength. From this information we will create a specific and focused treatment plan that will work to correct your imbalances and help you become a better runner.

Three Steps to Better Form

Video analysis and running assessment software

Biomechanical assessment of your strength and flexibility

Personalised video home exercise program which can be accessed on your smartphone or computer

Conditions Treated

Patellofemoral joint injury/runner’s knee

Gluteal tendinopathy

Achilles tendinopathy

Patellar tendinopathy

Shin splints

Hamstring tendinopathy

Groin pain

Tibialis posterior tendon injury

Plantar fasciitis

Iliotibial band syndrome

Hip impingement, labral injuries

Foot pain

Stress fractures

Chronic strains and sprains

and more!

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Exercise more for brain health!

Exercise more for brain health!

 

People who exercise have better mental fitness, and a new imaging study from UC Davis Health System shows why. Intense exercise increases levels of two common neurotransmitters — glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA — that are responsible for chemical messaging within the brain.

Published in this week’s issue of The Journal of Neuroscience, the finding offers new insights into brain metabolism and why exercise could become an important part of treating depression and other neuropsychiatric disorders linked with deficiencies in neurotransmitters, which drive communications between the brain cells that regulate physical and emotional health.

“Major depressive disorder is often characterized by depleted glutamate and GABA, which return to normal when mental health is restored,” said study lead author Richard Maddock, professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. “Our study shows that exercise activates the metabolic pathway that replenishes these neurotransmitters.”

The research also helps solve a persistent question about the brain, an energy-intensive organ that consumes a lot of fuel in the form of glucose and other carbohydrates during exercise. What does it do with that extra fuel?

“From a metabolic standpoint, vigorous exercise is the most demanding activity the brain encounters, much more intense than calculus or chess, but nobody knows what happens with all that energy,” Maddock said. “Apparently, one of the things it’s doing is making more neurotransmitters.”

The striking change in how the brain uses fuel during exercise has largely been overlooked in brain health research. While the new findings account for a small part of the brain’s energy consumption during exercise, they are an important step toward understanding the complexity of brain metabolism. The research also hints at the negative impact sedentary lifestyles might have on brain function, along with the role the brain might play in athletic endurance.

“It is not clear what causes people to ‘hit the wall’ or get suddenly fatigued when exercising,” Maddock said. “We often think of this point in terms of muscles being depleted of oxygen and energy molecules. But part of it may be that the brain has reached its limit.”

To understand how exercise affects the brain, the team studied 38 healthy volunteers. Participants exercised on a stationary bicycle, reaching around 85 percent of their predicted maximum heart rate. To measure glutamate and GABA, the researchers conducted a series of imaging studies using a powerful 3-tesla MRI to detect nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, which can identify several compounds based on the magnetic behavior of hydrogen atoms in molecules.

The researchers measured GABA and glutamate levels in two different parts of the brain immediately before and after three vigorous exercise sessions lasting between eight and 20 minutes, and made similar measurements for a control group that did not exercise. Glutamate or GABA levels increased in the participants who exercised, but not among the non-exercisers. Significant increases were found in the visual cortex, which processes visual information, and the anterior cingulate cortex, which helps regulate heart rate, some cognitive functions and emotion. While these gains trailed off over time, there was some evidence of longer-lasting effects.

“There was a correlation between the resting levels of glutamate in the brain and how much people exercised during the preceding week,” Maddock said. “It’s preliminary information, but it’s very encouraging.”

These findings point to the possibility that exercise could be used as an alternative therapy for depression. This could be especially important for patients under age 25, who sometimes have more side effects from selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), anti-depressant medications that adjust neurotransmitter levels.

For follow-up studies, Maddock and the team hope to test whether a less-intense activity, such as walking, offers similar brain benefits. They would also like to use their exercise-plus-imaging method on a study of patients with depression to determine the types of exercise that offer the greatest benefit.

“We are offering another view on why regular physical activity may be important to prevent or treat depression,” Maddock said. “Not every depressed person who exercises will improve, but many will. It’s possible that we can help identify the patients who would most benefit from an exercise prescription.”

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Why does exercise make us feel happy?

Why does exercise make us feel happy?

So we all know that feeling that we get after exercise – we feel generally happier, less stressed, less anxious and also sleep better. Exercise produces a rush of happy hormones we also know as endorphins. So what are these endorphins and why do they make us feel happy?

Endorphins are chemicals that are produced in our brains in response to stress or pain. Running, doing a hard workout, playing a sport or any exercise at all that increases our bodies stress response has the ability to make our brains release endorphins. The endorphins have the ability to travel through our neural networks as a neurotransmitter. One thing we do know about endorphins is that they make us feel really good. So how does this work then?

A part of the brain called the hypothalamus sends a signal to increase endorphin uptake through our bodies neural network when we subject ourselves to certain activities like exercise, sex, eat certain foods or experience pain. The endorphins then attach themselves to specific receptor sites within our neural network – these are called opioid receptors. These special receptors have the ability to block out pain signals and also to increase that euphoric happy feeling we get after we exercise. It is the same receptors that are locked onto when we take pain relief in the form of opiates.

Once we achieve a positive result in something we do, either though through exercise or simple activities like sticking to a plan you’ve made, your brain will also release another happy hormone called dopamine. Dopamine is responsible for us feeling addicted to pleasure seeking behaviors. By setting regular and achievable exercise goals that you reach it is highly possible to make exercise the trigger for your brain to release dopamine.

Serotonin is another one of our brains happy hormones that act as a natural anti-depressant. When we exercise serotonin levels in our brain increase and so does your level of happiness.

I know all these terms may seem confusing but there is another very important happy hormone called oxytocin. Oxytocin is released when we feel loved, cared for and connected to others. Your brain will also release oxytocin when you are kind to others.

So no matter how hard it may seem to get yourself moving on some days, putting one foot in front of the other and pushing yourself to move and exercise is not only good for your muscles and joints but also stimulates your brain. You’ll produce your very own happy hormones, reduces your stress levels and have you wanting to repeat it all over again next time. Give your fellow team mates, friends and family an encouraging kind words regularly as well- it will not only help them feel happy but will increase your happiness as well.

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