All Posts tagged shoe insoles

Osteoarthritis treatment

Osteoarthritis treatment

There is a common belief that there is not much you can do for osteoarthritis because the joint damage has already occurred and can’t be reversed. However it is often the inflammation of the tissue surrounding the joint and instability from the weakened tissues that lead to pain from an arthritic joint.

Our physiotherapists may be able to help you decrease the inflammation and pain around the joint and get you moving again. Here is some information about osteoarthritis and how we can help.

What is osteoarthritis?

Arthritis is a name for a group of conditions that cause damage to the joints in our body, usually causing pain and stiffness

Osteoarthritis is one of these conditions and it affects the whole joint, including bone, cartilage, ligaments and muscles

It is most prevalent in the joints of the hips, knees, neck, lower back, fingers and big toe, but can occur in any joint

It is degeneration of the joint structures, namely the cartilage (protective cushioning on the bony surfaces) and its underlying bone surfaces
Bony growths or spurs commonly known as osteophytes are common in osteoarthritis
Ligaments and muscles around the joint also deteriorate in osteoarthritis
It normally affects a joint on one side of the body i.e. it doesn’t normally occur bilaterally like other arthritic conditions

There are other arthritic conditions you may have heard of such as rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.

Signs and symptoms

Joint pain
Joint stiffness
Swelling of the joints
Symptoms usually develop and worsen gradually over months or years
Affecting ability to carry out normal daily activities
Clicking/grinding in the joint
Loss of flexibility in a joint
What causes osteoarthritis?
Previous joint trauma/injury
Being overweight greatly increases your risk
High joint stress/repetitive use/heavy loads
There is an increase risk as you age and there is more ‘wear and tear’ on the joints

Diagnosis

Arthritis can be diagnosed by taking a thorough history and physical examination
X-ray can help confirm a diagnosis – you may need to see your doctor to get a referral

Treatment

Our physiotherapists can help you with:
Strength and exercise programme
Joint mobilisation/soft tissue techniques
Hydrotherapy
Aids or braces
Education
Weight loss programme
Medication and joint supplements – your doctor can guide you on the best options
Surgical options such as joint replacement
Pre-operative rehabilitation has been shown to improve outcomes post-operatively, so if you are requiring surgery come and find out how you can help speed up your recovery with pre-hab

Some hints for the colder months

Cold weather can exacerbate joint pain and joint stiffness. Remembering a few common sense tips can help people with osteoarthritis survive cold weather:
Dress warmly and layer up
Exercise indoors to stay motivated and warmer
Use a heated pool for exercise – talk to your physiotherapist for local options and classes
Ensure your vitamin D levels are adequate
You don’t have to wait for the warmer months to reduce pain associated with osteoarthritis! Book an appointment with a physiotherapist online 24/7,

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Sore feet? Plantar fasciitis relief!

Sore feet? Plantar fasciitis relief!

Plantar fasciitis is inflammation of the plantar fascia and is the most common cause of heel pain. The plantar fascia is the thick band of connective tissue under the foot that runs from the heel bone at the back of your foot to the toes at the front. It essentially acts like a sling to support the arch of your foot.

What causes Plantar Fasciitis?
There are a number of causes including:
Age as it is more common in middle-aged people due to ‘sagging’ of the arch of the foot, but can occur in younger people who put a lot of load through their feet.Weaknesses can occur in the muscles that support the arch of the foot, which causes the plantar fascia to take an increased load which can irritate
Poor bio-mechanics can contribute to plantar fasciitis i.e. having flat feet or high archesWeight gain or excess weight can put extra load on the plantar fascia, irritating .
the tissues; this can also occur from the weight gain during pregnancy
Repetitive loading i.e. high level sports or working on your feet
Poor support from footwear i.e. worn or ill-fitting shoes
Arthritic foot joints can irritate the plantar fascia
Diabetic people have an increased chance of suffering from plantar fasciitis

Signs and Symptoms of Plantar Fasciitis
Pain at the base of the foot near the heel with weight-bearing
More pain after getting out of bed, or after prolonged sitting
Heel pain will be worse with the first few steps and will gradually improve as you move more

Diagnosis
Generally your physiotherapist will be able to diagnose plantar fasciitis from your history, symptoms and a clinical examination.

Treatment
Calf stretches often give relief to sufferers – it is important to stretch both calf muscles, so stretch with a straight leg and also a bent leg. Hold each stretch for 30 secs and repeat twice. Try to do this at least morning and night every day.
Freeze some water in an old water bottle and roll the bottom of your foot up and down on this.
Taping can offer you some relief while you are doing your exercises to off-load the plantar fascia.
Strengthening is an important component of treatment for plantar fasciitis as it improves the ability of the foot and ankle muscles to support the arch of your foot hence off-loading the plantar fascia.

Book an appointment with one of our physiotherapists who can help you with ideas for strengthening exercises to help ease the pain caused by plantar fasciitis.

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Foot Pain? Strengthen your foot ‘core’

Foot Pain? Strengthen your foot ‘core’

As your cold-weather footwear makes the seasonal migration from the back of your closet to replace summer’s flip flops and bare feet, don’t underestimate the benefits of padding around naked from the ankles down.

Barefoot activities can greatly improve balance and posture and prevent common injuries like shin splints, plantar fasciitis, stress fractures, bursitis, and tendonitis in the Achilles tendon, according to Patrick McKeon, a professor in Ithaca College’s School of Health Sciences and Human Performance.

The small, often overlooked muscles in the feet that play a vital but underappreciated role in movement and stability. Their role is similar to that of the core muscles in the abdomen.

“If you say ‘core stability,’ everyone sucks in their bellybutton,” he said. Part of the reason why is about appearance, but it’s also because a strong core is associated with good fitness. The comparison between feet and abs is intentional on McKeon’s part; he wants people to take the health of their “foot core” just as seriously.

The foot core feedback loop

McKeon describes a feedback cycle between the larger “extrinsic” muscles of the foot and leg, the smaller “intrinsic” muscles of the foot, and the neural connections that send information from those muscle sets to the brain.

“Those interactions become a very powerful tool for us,” he said. When that feedback loop is broken, though, it can lead to the overuse injuries that plague many an athlete and weekend warrior alike.

Shoes are the chief culprit of that breakdown, according to McKeon. “When you put a big sole underneath, you put a big dampening effect on that information. There’s a missing link that connects the body with the environment,” he said.

Muscles serve as the primary absorbers of force for the body. Without the nuanced information provided by the small muscles of the foot, the larger muscles over-compensate and over-exert past the point of exhaustion and the natural ability to repair. When the extrinsic muscles are no longer able to absorb the forces of activity, those forces are instead transferred to the bones, tendons, and ligaments, which leads to overuse injuries.

It’s not that McKeon is opposed to footwear. “Some shoes are very good, from the standpoint of providing support. But the consequence of that support, about losing information from the foot, is what we see the effects of [in overuse injuries].”

Strengthening the foot core

The simplest way to reintroduce the feedback provided by the small muscles of the foot is to shed footwear when possible. McKeon says activities like Pilates, yoga, martial arts, some types of dance, etc. are especially beneficial.

“Anything that has to deal with changing postures and using the forces that derive from the interaction with the body and the ground [is great for developing foot core strength],” he said.

McKeon also described the short-foot exercise, which targets the small muscles by squeezing the ball of the foot back toward the heel. It’s a subtle motion, and the toes shouldn’t curl when performing it. The exercise can be done anywhere while seated or standing, though he recommends first working with an athletic trainer or physical therapist to get familiar with the movement.

He notes the exercise seems to have especially positive results for patients suffering from ankle sprain, shin splints, and plantar fasciitis. It’s even been shown to improve the strain suffered by individuals with flat feet.

The payoff could be more than just physical, as there could be financial savings. With strong feet, McKeon suggests that — depending on the activity — consumers may not need to invest hundreds of dollars in slick, well-marketed athletic sneakers (though he doesn’t recommend going for the cheapest of cheap sneakers, either). People with a strong foot core can actively rely on the foot to provide proper support, rather than passively relying on the shoes alone.

“You might be able to get a $50 pair of basketball shoes that don’t have the typical support that you’d expect. Because you have strong feet, you’re just using the shoes to protect the feet and grip the ground,” he said.

The easiest way to get started on strengthening the small muscles of the foot, though, is to kick off your shoes in indoor environments.

“The more people can go barefoot, such as at home or the office, is a really good thing,” McKeon said.

Ithaca College. “Going barefoot: Strong ‘foot core’ could prevent plantar fasciitis, shin splints, and other common injuries.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 November 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/11/151117181929

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Foot Orthotics can reduce foot pain.

Foot Orthotics can reduce foot pain.

Custom-made insoles known as foot orthoses can reduce foot pain caused by arthritis, overly prominent big toe joints and highly arched feet, a new systematic review shows.

A team of Cochrane Researchers found that custom orthoses were safe interventions for foot pain in a number of different conditions. However, more research is required to develop an in depth understanding of their effectiveness.

Approximately one in four people are affected by foot pain at any given time. It is often disabling and can impair mood, behaviour, self-care ability and overall quality of life. People suffer from foot pain for a variety of reasons, but pain is more common in the elderly and those with chronic conditions such as arthritis. In the majority of cases, patients undergo a combination of different treatments, one of which may be custom-made foot orthoses (insoles moulded to a cast of the foot).

The Cochrane Systematic Review focuses on the results of 11 trials that together involved 1,332 people. Researchers found that custom foot orthoses can relieve pain within three months in adults with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, an early onset form of the disease. Adults with painful highly arched feet or painfully prominent big toe joints also benefited from treatment with orthoses over three and six month periods respectively.

“Custom foot orthoses can be an effective treatment for a variety of conditions, but there are still many causes of foot pain for which the benefit of this treatment is unclear. There is also a lack of data on the long term effects of treating with orthoses,” says Fiona Hawke, the lead researcher, who works at the Central Coast campus of the University of Newcastle, Australia.

Wiley-Blackwell. “Foot Pain? Custom-made Insoles Offer Relief.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 July 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080715204834.htm>.

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