All Posts tagged Spine

Motion is lotion

Motion is lotion

Understanding the “Why” behind Movement & Exercise

How do our mindset and beliefs around exercise affect the decisions we make? This blog explores the nitty-gritty of the “why” movement and exercise are beneficial to you in order to help you make the change you are seeking.

As Physiotherapists, one part of our job is to provide evidence-based education to our patients about the importance of movement and exercise. Movement can be active (something you do) or passive (something that is done to you such as joint mobilisation or muscle/nerve/fascia release as common examples). Saanich Physiotherapy  and Sports Clinic prides itself in providing an engaging holistic approach to your health & wellbeing. Movement and exercise are but one part of that approach.

We are each of us unique. We come with complexities and intricacies that make us who we are. In order to delve deeper to understand the “why”, it is important to highlight that all injuries are not the same, even if they are the same injury. Equally so, all pain is not the same, despite the pain seeming to originate from a particular region. Confused? It’s ok, it’s a little bit complex, but I promise to break it down for you so it’s easy to digest. No-one likes pain and our brains are wired to take short cut’s. It’s part of being human. We all want a quick fix. We don’t have time for this pain or injury. It’s stressing us out. Sometimes a quick fix can work to provide some temporary relief, and that’s ok. However, there is usually more to the story and so I will tell you about what we’ve learnt from the many 1000’s of patients we have had the pleasure of helping by getting to know their stories around exercise and movement.

If you’ve tried quick fixes and you haven’t solved the issue your internal voice may speak up and tell you to “do exercises to fix the issue”. That seems logical. Then you probably google it.

Movement and exercise to fix an issue

If logic has taken you on a bypass route straight to a Dr Google search or an Instagram video providing a generic or formulaic approach to exercise as a “fix”, the bypass route will not provide all the answers you need and may even steer you in the wrong direction. There is nothing wrong with information however, which information is critical. Which exercises? When to do them? How many to do? How often to do? When to increase? When to decrease? When to change? What if I get worse? Do I persist? Do I modify? How should I modify? These and many more questions will not be answered by trying to skip the longer scenic route with your physiotherapist as your co-driver and guide to improving your skill. Heading straight to the bypass route either solo or with only partial information that applies to you specifically will often lead to an aggravation of your pain and a delay in the healing process.

Please don’t stop reading here as there is so much more to share with you. Your Physiotherapists job is to know people and people are like complex ecosystems. Bodies – brains, hormones, muscles, bones, tendons, ligaments, nerves, fascia, neural networks, chemicals transmitting signals everywhere, emotions, expectations, histories, unconscious and conscious biases and everything that makes you tick, it’s all interacting with your environment, with other people, constantly re-evaluating. How amazing is that? People are awesome. You are awesome and that is why you need a multifaceted and complex problem-solving approach to your treatment. That is what we do. There are no exceptions. None of us can say we are exempt, we don’t get to opt-out, as we are all made up of the same pieces, it’s just that our jigsaw puzzle, once completed, like our neural networks and their interconnectedness, looks different to anyone else’s. And that is the beauty of people and everything each of us brings with us.

Mindset and Beliefs

Before we look at the “why” exercise is important, it is imperative to understand the mindset and beliefs we each carry within us in relation to movement and exercise. Simply hearing the word “exercise” can invoke a range of varying emotions and responses in each of us. These responses are based on our subconscious and conscious biases, our way of thinking, our past and recent experiences.

We all know exercise is supposed to be good for us – but “knowing” is simply often not enough to make the leap to effect a change in our behaviour, specifically around learning and developing new patterns of behaviour. In order to learn and lay down new habits, we must “do”, we need to act and we must “repeat”. Another vital link to laying down new patterns of behaviour is attributing a positive meaning to our new “doing”, in this case, exercise. Here we explore a range of common responses to exercise prescription or even the thought of doing exercises and the likely mindset linked to each.

This could be anything from:
*a closed mindset response – I am not doing that
*a negative mindset response- I don’t want to do that
*a stress response – I don’t have time
*a fear response – I can’t do that
*an avoidance response – that doesn’t apply to me
*an unsure response – I didn’t know that could help
*an angry response – I don’t want exercises. I just want someone to fix me
*a curious mindset response– how will that help me, can you tell me more so I can understand?
*an open mindset response – I will do my best to execute that
*an eager response – what can I do to help myself
*an overeager response – If I just do a lot of these this should fix my issue
*an honest response – I may not have the time, nor energy, but I understand that this can help me so I’ll give it a try
* a mindful response ­ I will tell myself I’ve done a good job when I do my exercises, even if it’s not as often as it could be, I am doing the best I can at this moment.
*a non-judgemental response – I will not tell myself off if I don’t do my exercises as this is not helpful to me learning new patterns of movement and exercises.

Exercise prescription – Finally the nitty-gritty of why exercise and movement are good for us

Exercise prescription can be given for a range of reasons too. The majority of the physiotherapy patient population are prescribed exercises for improving the functionality of a muscle – it may be weak, lacking endurance capacity or overactive and tight. A muscle can also be slow at responding to input from our immediate surroundings which can affect our sense of balance and lead to issues such as falling over.

However, exercise can be given for other reasons too, such as pain modulation, down-regulating an overactive and sensitized nervous system, improvement in bone density, decreasing stress hormones (ie cortisol ) and substance p ( a neurotransmitter & neuromodulating chemical responsible for providing information back to our central nervous system about pain sensations in the body), to minimise and manage the inflammatory chemical response to acute injury or chronic stress on the immune system ( there are many inflammatory mediating chemicals that are produced inside our bodies such as histamines, prostaglandins and bradykinin – this one increases the bodies sensitivity to pain).

Exercise and diet may also assist in the management of overproduction of pro-inflammatory hormones (such as insulin and eicosanoids). An overproduction of these hormones can lead to chronic hyperactivity of our immune system and the development of immune system disorders (including but not limited to rheumatoid arthritis, Crohns’s disease, asthma, ulcers, cancer, atherosclerosis {heart disease}, sinusitis and more ).

Exercise decreases the levels of TNF (tumour necrosis factor) and CRP (C-reactive protein), which are both involved in systemic inflammation. In order to maximise the benefits of exercise and avoid chronic inflammation, we need to ensure we allow sufficient time for your body to recover after each strenuous exercise session.

Foods that increase the inflammatory response in our body are sugars, refined carbohydrates, saturated fats, trans fats, omega 6 fatty acids, MSG, gluten and casein (arthritis.org ).

Exercise can help us to get to sleep (when we get into a regular morning exercise routine our brain produces a sleep chemical called melatonin and exercise also stimulate the brain to produce a chemical called adenosine which makes us feel sleepy). Your circadian rhythm (your natural sleep/wake cycle) is maintained with regular exercise and therefore your sleep patterns are maintained consistently. This is very important in the management of pain and mental health stability.
Exercise regulates our mental health by reducing the body’s arousal, anxiety and depressive symptoms (after exercise our brain produces endorphins, dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and these chemicals make us feel happy and improves our sense of wellbeing ).

Exercise helps our brains remain engaged. As we age, our brain needs to keep learning new things to keep it active and exercise can play a major role in keeping neural circuits in our brain open or creating new neural circuits. By engaging in exercise, we effectively slow down the process of ageing. Working on proprioception, which is your brains understanding of where you are in the world, you can improve your balance reactions, allowing you to do more for yourself and prevent falls.

So that is my condensed version of the nitty-gritty of why exercise is good for us. For me, I enjoyed sharing with you my passion for moving and I hope you learned a few new things too; and now both you, who has most likely sat for a length of time to read this article and me, as I have sat for a lengthier time to write this article, need to get up and move.

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How Can I Prevent Back Pain?

How Can I Prevent Back Pain?

How Can I Prevent Back Pain?

The latest research tells us that often people have never had a physical trauma to cause back pain like a car accident, falling, or lifting something heavy. There are usually a combination of factors that cause back pain which could include overuse, poor posture or other stressors.

Keeping in mind everyone is different, here are some expert tips:

Exercise! you can’t escape it, exercise is important for so many reasons, but a big one is preventing back pain. Muscles are meant to move. If you aren’t in good shape, you’re more likely to hurt your back and feel pain when you do even simple movements, such as getting out of the car. Exercise helps keep your joints fluid and your muscles strong.

Core & glute strength a regular strength-training routine that focuses on training your muscles to work together can help support your spine. Core muscles include your pelvis, lower back, hips and abdomen. Strong, activated glute muscles help protect your back from activities such as lifting a heavy object.

Eat well healthy eating habits can keep your weight down. Being overweight can put added strain on all of your joints, especially your spine.

Posture awareness be aware of how often you slouch over your laptop and iphone when texting. Take the time to take a break from long periods in front of the computer with a simple walk around the block or some hip-flexor stretches.

Reduce stress stress can impact your level of pain. Stress causes you to tense your muscles and constant tension can cause back pain. Take up a hobby or regular activity that helps you relax.

Sleep style for most, sleeping on your back can put pressure on your spine, pop a pillow under your knees to reduce this. If you’re a tummy sleeper, put a pillow under your pelvis. Side sleeping is generally the best way to go (but everyone is different!)

Lower back pain can be debilitating and can have a major effect on your daily life and work activities. Don’t let that happen to you, put in place some positive things today.

Physiotherapists are experts in the assessment of musculoskeletal injuries, especially spinal related pain, that’s why we can help you. We can help you with a strengthening home/gym-program for whole-body awareness, strength and posture improvements.

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Neck Pain Victoria – Text Neck?

Neck Pain Victoria – Text Neck?

Are our devices giving us neck pain?

There are millions of people right now looking down at their smartphone or tablet. Do you ever stop to think about what this might be doing to your neck and upper back?

At Saanich Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic, we are seeing a huge increase in the amount of neck, upper back, shoulder and arm pain which is all related to posture when using devices. From texting on the smartphone to watching TV on the tablet in bed, we are all guilty in some way. And sadly, we are seeing more and more children coming in with these issues too.

Consider how much your head actually weighs. On average, it weighs 4.5-5kg. When sitting or standing upright, this weight is supported by the lower neck vertebrae, intervertebral discs, muscles and ligaments. When you then lean your head forward when looking at your smartphone, the relative weight of your head on your neck muscles can increase up to 27kg! Just by looking down at your phone, you can increase the force on your lower neck by 5 times!

When maintaining this position for a period of time, the muscles will fatigue and stop working, meaning that the force of your head is now being held up by small ligaments, the neck joints and the discs in the neck. It is no wonder people are having more and more neck pain.

The term “Text Neck” is becoming more commonly accepted as a diagnosis for neck pain caused by prolonged use of smartphones and tablets. If left untreated, this massive increase in force in the lower neck and lead to headaches, increased arching of the spine, general pain and tightness and arm pain from irritating nerves in the neck. It can also cause weakening of the muscles in the neck which can lead to ongoing pain, stiffness, headaches or arm pain in the future.

With the increase in children having smartphones and even the use of tablets in school, there are becoming more and more postural issues arising which is definitely a concern for ongoing and long term neck and upper back problems later in life.

Text Neck can be treated. Your Physiotherapist may use joint mobilizations, soft tissue massage, taping or even dry needling to help restore normal movement within the joints and muscles.

However, it is imperative that you strengthen the muscles in the neck and upper back to prevent long term issues. Your Physiotherapist will tailor a program for you to complete at home or might even recommend core conditioning or yoga classes for a supervised strengthening program.

If you, your children or another family member or friend are guilty of using their smartphone or tablet too much and are noticing pain or discomfort in their neck, upper back or arm make sure you book an assessment with your Physiotherapist sooner rather than later!

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Gym Injury Prevention

Gym Injury Prevention

WEIGHT TRAINING INJURIES

Improper weight-training techniques can lead to weight training injuries. The most common areas to be injured are the back, shoulders, and knees.

Back Injuries

Back sprains and strains most commonly result from improper lifting technique when performing exercises such as bench presses, deadlifts, and rows. Sprains involve stretching of ligaments while strains involve stretching of muscles or tendons. Initial treatment involves the R.I.C.E. method (i.e. Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation). Assessment and treatment by your physiotherapist are also valuable. At Saanich Physio your Physiotherapist can help you minimise the risk of obtaining weight training injuries.

Training Tip: The risk of back injuries can be reduced by maintaining a neutral spine and avoiding flexing or extending the lower back under heavy load.

Shoulder injuries

Lifting weights overhead incorrectly can lead to injuries such as shoulder impingement syndrome and rotator cuff damage. Shoulder impingement syndrome is when swelling and inflammation of structures in, and around the shoulder results in pain in the front and side of the shoulder/upper arm. Rotator cuff damage causes pain and weakness of shoulder movement. Treatment for these conditions may include physiotherapy and anti-inflammatory medication in minor cases; and cortisone injections and potentially surgery in more serious cases.

Training Tip: The risk of shoulder injuries increases with excessive repetitions. Ensure you also train other body parts to give your shoulders adequate recovery time between training sessions.

Knee Injuries

Repetitive knee exercises such as squats, lunges, deep knee bends, jumps, knee extension and leg lifts can cause pain at the front of the knee. Injury to the patellar tendon (the tendon that connects the kneecap to the shin bone) can occur with overuse. Small tears develop in the tendon leading to pain just below the kneecap. Treatment in the form of physiotherapy and a patellar tendon strap often helps to reduce symptoms and your doctor may also recommend anti-inflammatory medications.

Training Tip: Ensure that your kneecap tracks correctly (i.e. over the outside of the foot) during squat and lunge exercises.

If you feel pain from weight lifting in the gym seek treatment and corrective strategies from us at Saanich Physio. The longer you keep training with an injury or small niggles that can turn into bigger injuries, the longer your recovery time will be. Seek help early and keep yourself in the gym – there is no need to suffer from weight training injuries.

REFERENCES:
Aasa U, Svartholm I, Andersson F, et al. Injuries among weightlifters and powerlifters: a systematic review. Br J Sports Med 2017; 51:211-220.

Kerr ZY, Collins CL, Comstock RD. Epidemiology of weight training-related injuries presenting to United States emergency departments, 1990 to 2007. Am J Sports Med 2010; 38(4): 765-71.

Mazur LJ, Yetman RJ, Risser WL. Weight-training injuries. Common injuries and preventative methods. Sports Med 1993; 16(1): 57-63.

Siewe J et al. Injuries and Overuse Syndromes in Competitive and Elite Bodybuilding. Int J Sports Med 2014; 35: 943-948.

Siewe J et al. Injuries and Overuse Syndromes in Powerlifting. Int J Sports Med 2011; 32: 703-711.

Weisenthal BM, Beck CA et al. Injury Rate and Patterns Among CrossFit Athletes. The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine 2014; 2(4): 1-7.

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